Sorghum



Sorghum is a genus of several species of grasses, grown for grain, fiber and fodder. Sorghum is planted in warmer climates worldwide, and the species are native to tropical and subtropical regions of all continents, including South West Pacific and Australasia. Sorghum species are an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia. It is the fifth most important cereal crop grown in the world.

Sorghum bicolor (Sorghum japonicum) is a primary cultivated species of Sorghum, cultivated for grain for human consumption and for animal feed. The plant is originated in northern Africa and can grow up to 4 meters tall. It bears grains that are small, 3-4 mm in diameter. Sorghum bicolor can be used as a source for making ethanol fuel. It is one of the most drought-resistant crops of all because of the four features that it produced. Sorghum bicolor has a very large root-to-leaf surface area; it will rolled its leaves to lessen water-loss by transpiration during dry season; it will go into dormancy during prolong drought; and the leaves are protected by waxy cuticle.

Sweet sorghum is any of the varieties of Sorghum which is grown primarily for forage, silage (fermented, high-moisture fodder), and sugar production. Sweet sorghum can thrive under drier and warmer conditions than many other crops.

Sweet sorghum syrup is called molasses or sorghum molasses in some regions of US, even though the term molasses is more properly refers to the by product of the sugarcane or sugar beet production. In India, and other places, sweet sorghum stalks are used for producing bio-fuel by squeezing the juice, and later fermenting into ethanol. Most sorghum grown in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Tennessee, are for syrup production. Most species of sorghum are drought tolerant and heat tolerant. They are especially important in arid regions where the grain is a staple food for poor and rural people. Many species are used for food, fodder, in the production of alcoholic beverages, and as bio-fuel.

In China, sorghum is fermented and distilled to produce maotai and kaoliang, two of the country's most famous liquors.

Sorghum straw (Stem fibers) can be made into wall board for house building, as well as biodegradable packaging.

SorghumSorghum
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sorghum.jpg
authorshipSlomox
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Sorghum bicolorSorghum bicolor
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sorghum_bicolor02.jpg
authorshipPethan
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Sorghum bicolorSorghum bicolor
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sorghum_bicolor03.jpg
authorshipPethan
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A field of hybrid sorghumA field of hybrid sorghum
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sorghum_field.png
authorshipAyacop
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Sorghum bicolorSorghum bicolor
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sorghum_bicolor_Bild0902.jpg
authorshipMarco Schmidt
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Seeds of Sorghum bicolorSeeds of Sorghum bicolor
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sorghum_bicolor_subsp._bicolor_seeds.jpg
authorshipTracey Slotta
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Sweet Sorghum SyrupSweet Sorghum Syrup
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Madhura_syrup.jpg
authorshipAkraj
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