Papaya



The Papaya is the fruit of a large tree-like plant. It comes from the genus Carica. The papaya is a native of tropical Americas. It was cultivated in Mexico several centuries before the emergence of the Mesoamerican classic cultures. It is sometimes called a "big melon" or a "paw paw" but the North American pawpaw is a different species, in the genus Asimina.

The papaya tree grows to a height of 5 to 10 meters with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk; the lower trunk is conspicuously scarred where leaves and fruit were borne. The leaves are large, 50-70 cm diameter, deeply palmately lobed with 7 lobes. The tree is usually unbranched if unlopped. The flowers are similar in shape to the flowers of the Plumeria but are much smaller and wax like. They appear on the axils of the leaves, maturing into the large 15-45 cm long, 10-30 cm diameter fruit. The fruit is ripe when it feels soft (like a ripe avocado or a bit softer) and its skin has attained an amber to orange hue. The fruit's taste is vaguely similar to peach, although much milder without the tartness.

It is the first fruit tree to have its genome deciphered.

Originally from southern Mexico, Central America and northern South America, the papaya is now cultivated in most countries with a tropical climate, such as Brazil, India, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Haiti and Southeast Asia.

The ripe fruit is usually eaten raw, without the skin or seeds. The unripe green fruit of papaya can be eaten cooked, usually in curries, salads and stews. It also has a relatively high amount of pectin, which can be used to make jellies.

Green papaya fruit and the tree's latex are both rich in an enzyme called papain, a protease which is useful in tenderizing meat and other proteins. Its ability to break down tough meat fibers was utilized for thousands of years by indigenous Americans. It is included as a component in powdered meat tenderizers, and is also marketed in tablet form to remedy digestive problems. Green papaya is used in Thai cuisine, both raw and cooked.

Papain is also popular (in countries where it grows) as a topical application in the treatment of cuts, rashes, stings and burns. Papain ointment is commonly made from fermented papaya flesh, and is applied as a gel-like paste. Harrison Ford was treated for a ruptured disc incurred during filming of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom by papain injections.

Women in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and other parts of the world have long used green papaya as a folk remedy for contraception and abortion. Medical research in animals has confirmed the contraceptive and abortifacient capability of papaya, and also found that papaya seeds have contraceptive effects in adult male langur monkeys, possibly in adult male humans as well. Unripe papaya is especially effective in large amounts or high doses. Papaya is not teratogenic and will not cause miscarriage in small, ripe amounts. Phytochemicals in papaya may suppress the effects of progesterone. In India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and have used green papaya as an Instant Fix for Making the Meat Tender, the warmth of the Fruit turns the otherwise hard meat or tough Meat into tender Grill-able Meat used in barbecues and Gravy.

The black seeds are edible and have a sharp, spicy taste. They are sometimes ground up and used as a substitute for black pepper. In some parts of Asia the young leaves of papaya are steamed and eaten like spinach. In parts of the world papaya leaves are made into tea as a preventative for Malaria, though there is no real scientific evidence for the effectiveness of this treatment.

The papaya fruit is susceptible to the Papaya Fruit Fly. This wasp-like fly lays its eggs in young fruit. In cultivation it grows rapidly fruiting within 3 years, however it is highly frost sensitive.

Papaya treePapaya tree
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Starr_080531-4914_Carica_papaya.jpg
authorshipForest & Kim Starr
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Male papaya flowerMale papaya flower
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Carica_papaya_fl_male.jpg
authorshipPancrat
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PapayaPapaya
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Papaya_-_two_half_fruits_of_different_size.jpg
authorshipGenet
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PapayaPapaya
photo sourcehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Starr_061105-1374_Carica_papaya.jpg
authorshipForest & Kim Starr
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