Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) Gardening


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Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is a creeping vine in the family Araceae, native to southeastern Asia and New Guinea. It is also known as Devil's Ivy, Solomon Islands' Ivy, Silver Vine, and Centipede tongavine. It is grown for its foliage.

Pothos is an epiphyte, growing up to 20 m long, with stem up to 4 cm in diameter, climbing by means of aerial roots which hook on trees and supports. The evergreen leaves are alternate, heart-shape, up to 100 cm long and 45 cm wide. As a houseplant, pothos can grow up to 2 m tall or more, given suitable support.

Pothos is a popular houseplant with many cultivars, selected for their variegated foliage that streak with white, yellow, or light green. Cultivars like Jade, Golden and Marble Queen are the most sought-after pothos. Pothos grows well in light shade or indirect light, as direct sunlight can scorch the leaves. It requires a temperature of between 17-30 degree Celsius, and any well-drained, moisture-retentive soil is suitable. Water regularly, less in cold weather. The stems need good supports. It can grow in both soil and hydroponically. Remove shoot tips to induce branching at any time.

All parts of the plant may cause severe discomfort if ingested; contact with the sap may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction. It is important to keep small children and pets away from the plant due to the poisonous sap. Symptoms include oral irritation, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Propagation is by leaf bud or stem-tip cuttings in late spring, or by layering in summer. Pothos can become a highly invasive species in places where it is not a native.


Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)
Author: Sueska152 (public domain)






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